“The career fair brought firms to our university that offered real opportunities that are worthwhile and can ultimately lead to careers.”

Casey Rowe, senior finance major

KSB fair

Trine University students Jayde Abenth, middle, and Erin Shafer, right, speak with Kyle Lynch, a composites senior FP&A process analyst at Owens Corning and a 2011 Trine University graduate, during the Ketner School of Business Career Fair on Oct. 10.

More than 600 students participate in events

More than 90 businesses and organizations participated in career fairs and industry nights at Trine University this fall, with more than 600 students participating in the events.

The Engineering & Technology Career Fair was held Sept. 22, the Ketner School of Business Career Fair was held Oct. 10, the Rinker-Ross School of Health Science Career Night was held Oct. 26 and the Jannen School of Arts & Sciences Career Fair was Nov. 16. Junior and senior students attended the Character and Competence Accounting Career Fair at Grace College in Winona Lake on Sept. 14.

The university also hosted “Business Experience Speaks: What’s it like in the real world?” on Oct. 11, where recent alumni shared their work experiences.

Such events are part of the reason the university continues to boast a high employment rate for its graduates. The university recently announced that 99.3 percent of its Class of 2016 was either employed or continuing education within six months of graduation.

Linda Cooper, employment specialist in Trine’s Employment Resource Center, which hosted the on-campus fairs, said the events help students connect with potential employers and learn more about different career paths within different organizations.

“Many students use career fairs as a chance to learn about different opportunities, to network, and practice interviewing skills,” she said.

Casey Rowe, a senior finance major, recently accepted a full-time job offer with his employer of choice, WestPoint Financial Group, after participating in the Ketner School of Business Career Fair.

“The career fair brought firms to our university that offered real opportunities that are worthwhile and can ultimately lead to careers, rather than just a job,” he said. “These firms were seeking Trine students, not just showing up and going through the motions. They offered a mutual opportunity for students who were looking for careers, and employers who were looking for students to start careers."

Cooper said employers as well as students are getting a good return on investment for their participation in career fairs. Comments from employers included, “We are very impressed with the caliber of students we met” and “This seems like a great place to go to school. We are interested in forming relationships with other departments and hope to employ your students!”

“One hundred percent of the employers attending events indicated in evaluations that they met candidates who fit requirements of their organization,” she said.

Trine University will offer another opportunity for area employers to connect with its students at its All Majors Career & Internship Fair on Thursday, Feb. 2. For more information or to register, visit bit.ly/TrineCareerFair17.